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Carbon Nanotubes Modified with an Ultrafast Laser

High magnification SEM image of a carbon nanotube mat modified by shots from a femtosecond laser. Accelerating voltage 2kV.

Image by John Mansfield

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Carbon Nanotubes Modified with an Ultrafast Laser

High magnification SEM image of a carbon nanotube mat modified by shots from a femtosecond laser. Accelerating voltage 2kV.

Image by John Mansfield

Dr. Kai Sun

Kai Sun

Associate Research Scientist (North Campus)

Address:
Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory (North Campus)
University of Michigan
417 Space Research Building
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143

E-mail: kaisun@umich.edu
Phone: (734) 936-3353
Fax: (734) 763-2282
MSE Homepage: http://www.mse.engin.umich.edu/people/faculty/sun

Contact me for:
TEM, SEM, XPS:
Equipment training and problems in EMAL.

Schedule
My normal schedule is ~9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., 5 days a week.

How to get training
E-mail me or call me to set up a training session. You should include in your email some details about your sample and what information you are trying to discover. Let me know if you have any prior experience in the technique. Training usually takes a couple of hours for the SEM. The TEMs are more specialized and can take much longer. For example, to become familiar with the TEM, we recommend you take the Electron Microscopy course, MSE-562, offered in the winter term by the Materials Science and Engineering Department. This course includes a large lab component in addition to theory on the operation of the microscope.

Kai's research work focuses on characterization of materials by analytical electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques and synthesis of nanostructured materials by electron and focused ion beams. Current research involves the study of heterogeneous catalysts used for hydrogen energy generation and metal thin films grown on different substrates. Atomic resolution high-angle annular dark-field imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy that can be performed simutaneously in an analytical electron microscope are main techniques in such studies. More recent interest is on the development of in-situ transmission electron micrscopy techniques for the study of catalysts.